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Newspaper Rock

Newspaper Rock
Category: Bed Collections

The Navajo call it "Tse Hane'," the rock that tells a stroy Two hundred-square-foot Newspaper Rock in Utah's Canyonlands National Park is covered with rock designs that inspired this blaket. The earliest symbols were carved as many as 2,000 years ago. Over the centuries, Fremont, Anasazi, Navajo and Ute cultures carved figures and shapes into the "desert varnish," a blackish manganese-iron deposit that gradually forms on explosed sanstone. The black rock was an invitation to creativity. As the sharp tools of ancient artists chipped away, the pale rock beneath was revealed. Hundreds of images can be seen in these stories made in stone. The petroglyphs feature a mixture of human, animal and abstract forms. Depictions of deer, pronghorn antelope and human hands on the blanket let us imagine the hunters, the stories, the messages and the news of thsose days long gone. Unnapped, sueded trim. 82% wool/18% cotton. Dry clean. Made in the USA.

Price: $239.00

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Tamiami Trail

Tamiami Trail
Category: Bed Collections

By the end of the Seminole Wars in 1858, the Seminole population of Florida was reduced from thousands to a few hundred. Most had been driven out of Florida but small bands remained in the Everglades and Big Cypress Swamp. There they retained their culture-farming, hunting alligators and building thatch-roofed homes called chickees. They traveled in dugout canoes made from cypress logs, visiting trading posts along ther Miami River with pelts and egret plumes to trade for supplies. When the first sewing machines arrived, Seminole women began making intricate colorful patchwork by sewing long stropes of fabric together. In 1928, the Tamiami trail, the highway from tampa to Miami, opened and the Seminole saw new trade opportunities. They took advantage of the tourist market for crafts such as patchwork and palmetto dolls. Their entrepreneurial success along the Tamiami Trail is a testimony to Seminole creativity and resilience. Unnapped, sueded trim. 82% wool/18% cotton. Dry clean. Made in the USA.

Price: $239.00

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Saxony Hills

Saxony Hills
Category: Bed Collections

The Saxony Hills Blankets reference the changing landscape of Navajo weaving in the 1800s. Spanish explorers had introduced Churro sheep to the Southwest in the late 17th century. The Churro bred by the Navajo produced a somewhat coarse, long-staple wool that was hand-spun and woven into shoulder robes or blankets, shirts and sashes. Hand-spun wool from these animals was the main source of yarn for Navajo blanets until the 1860s. Then Saxony yarns arrived in the Southwest by way of the Santa Fe Trail and later the railroad. These fine 3-ply yarns spun from the wool of merino sheep were produced in Saxony, a former German state, and in England, France, and New England. By the mid-1900s, Saxony yarns were used by the Navajos for general weaving. The Saxony Hills Blanket incorportates traditional, geometric Navajo motifs-diamonds, stepped triangles and Spider Woman cross patterns. Unnapped, sueded trim. 82% wool/18% cotton. Dry clean. Made in the USA.

Price: $239.00

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Great Plains

Great Plains
Category: Bed Collections

The repeated geometric designs on this subtly patterened blanket evoke the unique functional art of Plains Indians. Women of the Great Plains tribes-Sioux, Arapaho, Kiowa, Blackfoot, Cheyenne and others-created clothing, moccasins, leggings, bags and pouches made of tanned animal hides. The skins of deer, sheep, elk and buffalo were decorated with embroidery, quillwork, painting, and rawhide stitching and lacing. The pieces were sometimes embellished with beads, feathers and fringe. This decorative art using abstract geometirc designs was primarily the creative work of women. Realistic art such as the hide painting on tepees, and robes was practiced chiefly by men recording war or hunting deeds. Napped, whipstich binding. 82% wool/18% cotton. Dry clean. Made in the USA.

Price: $239.00

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Los Ojos, Black

Los Ojos, Black
Category: Bed Collections

Spanish crosses, diamond-shaped "eyes" (ojos) and the symbols of the Navajo Four Mountain of Creation are dramatic in black and white. Both modern looking and historc, this boldly graphic pattern reverses to a striking white backround on blankets and shams. Unnapped, sueded trim. 82% pure virgin wool/18% cotton. Dry clean. Made in the USA. Standard sham fits 20 in. x 26 in. pillow.

Price: $239.00

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Starry Night Quilt

Starry Night Quilt
Category: Bed Collections

This star treatment is a salute to a host of American quilters: pioneer women, Native Americans, the Amish and today's contemporary quilt artists. The lone or morning star, a traditional quilting image, comes blazing into a colorful modern univers. An eight-point star explodes with dizzying color against a galaxy-black background and brilliant tumbling blocks. The habdstitched design brings three dimensional drama to contemporary or traditional decors. 100% cotton. Machine washable. Imported.

Price: $159.00

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Glacier Park Flannel Sheets

Glacier Park Flannel Sheets
Category: Bed Collections

Introducing Pendleton’s own pure cotton flannel sheets, gently brushed for exceptional softness. Printed in our signature Chief Joseph pattern to complement any bed in your home with quality, value and comfort. Made in Germany using a tightly woven flannel, for a substantial long-wearing finish. Set includes one flat sheet, one fitted sheet and two pillowcases. 100% cotton flannel. Machine washable. Imported.

Price: $119.00

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Midnight Eyes

Midnight Eyes
Category: Bed Collections

This Native American-inspired pattern, woven in our American mills, is a tribute to the creatures of the night. According to Cherokee legend, when the animals and plants were first made they were told to watch and stay awake for seven nights�just as young men sometimes fast and keep awake during their vision quest. Nearly all the animals made it through the first night, but several dropped off to sleep on the second. Each night thereafter, others nodded off until on the seventh night only the owl, the panther and a few more were still awake. These animals were given the power to see and go about in the dark, and to prey on the birds and animals that must sleep at night. The diamonds in this pattern suggest those keen nocturnal eyes that look fearlessly into the darkness and see all. Unnapped, sueded trim. 82% wool/18% cotton. Dry clean. Made in the USA.

Price: $239.00

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Quill Basket

Quill Basket
Category: Bed Collections

The Micmac (Mi'kmaq), a First Nations people of New England and eastern Canada, tell of a long-ago star that fell from the sky into the Atlantic Ocean and crawled to shore. The People called it "gog-wit" which means "eight-legged star fish." The image appeared on petroglyphs in Nova Scotia 500 years ago. It later became the defining motif on Micmac quilled birch basket - and the inspiration for this blanket's central element. Porcupine quills are one of the oldest forms of embellishment found on hides and baskets. The Micmac artisans were so skilled at quillwork, the French called them "Porcupine Indians." Their quill-decorated baskets set the standard for the craft, which flourished for centuries among Eastern, Great Lakes and Plains tribes. Later embroidery traditions using glass beads, which replaced quills in the mid-1800s, were built upon Micmac techniques and designs. This blanket's intricate pattern and subtle colors, woven in our American mills, are a tribute to the ancient art of quilled basketry. Unnapped, sueded trim. 82% wool/18% cotton. Dry clean. Made in the USA.

Price: $239.00

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Santa Fe Saxony

Santa Fe Saxony
Category: Bed Collections

It is said that Spider Woman taught the Dine(Navajo) to weave under the direction of her husband Spider Man. Generations of accomplished Navajo weavers have practiced their skill and shared their gifts with an admiring world. This intricate geometric design references a step in the evolution of Navajo weaving. The opening of the Santa Fe Trail in 1821 brought about many changes from the Classical period. By the 1860s new weaving techniques and available yarns contributed to more elaborate designs. Fine, silky-smooth 3-ply merino yarns from Saxony, Germany, were among those that were imported and began to supplement the natural fleece-colored yarns commonly seen. New yarns made possible exciting variations in colors and sophisticated patterns as seen in this blanket's elaborate terraced meanders, chevrons, zigzags, stepped diamonds and Spider Woman crosses. Unnapped, sueded trim. 82% wool/18% cotton. Dry clean. Made in the USA.

Price: $239.00

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